Tag: shorty Jack Russell

Adult puppy

the-tale-of-buddy
We have one dog, a corgi, who smiles all of the time, and Buddy who doesn’t.

I intended to write one post on how Buddy has come to us, his quirks, and recent regression to training pads, when I realized that would be far too long a post. So I will be posting a series on Buddy the shorty Jack Russell. I hope you will join me on this journey with a dog I never wanted but would never give up.

Chapter One

I’ve written and photographed our shorty Jack Russell but I am not sure I have ever explained how this — oh let’s call him “unique” — dog came into our lives.

Buddy, as his previous owners, our son and his first wife, named him had to be the most unattractive dog on the planet. I am being kind in this description, he was ugly. Not his fault, he had been neglected.

But from the start:

Our former daughter-in-law went to a pet supply store in Orlando to get a collar for another dog and came home with a pink dog. Pink because he had no fur. He had pretty much given up on the world he was given to her by a “rescue” group – no application, nothing. Lucky for Buddy, but I wasn’t sure about the rest of us.

Buddy “faints”

Buddy had, make that has, issues. Seizures that are psychologically based according to our vet. A perfect example is his early “fainting” episodes.

While we were dog sitting we took both dogs to an event at Washington Oaks Garden State Park (If you have never been to this park and you are on the East Coast of Florida you must visit).

While walking the dogs, Buddy falls over. Seriously a straight drop, 90 degrees sideways, to the ground. He didn’t collapse, he just went from standing to lying on his side in the same position – wide awake. A woman at the plant sale stand nearby gasped and asked, “did your dog just faint?”

No, “he just does that.” we responded as though it were the most normal thing in the world.

I am happy to report that Buddy doesn’t do that any longer so progress is being made.

Tomorrow: How did Buddy get from Florida to Arizona and back again?

 

Don’t look now — you’ve been adopted

Reprtinted from the Palm Coast Observer

The best pet isn’t the one you adopt, it’s the one that adopts you.

Car riders

 

I have written columns, had my own pet blog, and worked with humane societies for more than 20 years, and there are certain things I know to be true.

First: Puppies and kittens are adopted first. Litters come into shelters with moms, and the kids go first — mom is left behind.

Second: Everyone is looking for a dog or cat of a specific breed or age.

I don’t blame them. I too have my favorites. Right now it’s Pembroke Welsh Corgis – only because that is what my son adopted from the St. Augustine Humane Society nearly 10 years ago.

My first two dogs were given to me, they were both purebred breeds –- with papers. I never really found a need for those papers.

The last dog type I would have gone into a shelter looking for, was a Labrador/chow mix with a squinty eye – but that’s what my Shadow was. She was joined by Luna, a golden retriever/chow, and the two became my “girls.”

I have learned that letting the animal adopt me works out quite well. Oh I would love to have another corgi – absolutely – but if my pet adoption history has taught me anything, I need to be ready for the unexpected. Buddy, the new shorty Jack Russell in our pack, certainly meets that critera. Now there’s a dog I definitely never thought we would have. Now I can’t imagine the household without him.

Pet Dish

Another group that gets overlooked are those with special needs. No one wants shelters to euthanize animals, but what if no one wants the animals? Are the animals supposed to live in cages their entire lives? No, they are supposed to be surrounded by a loving family.

The Flagler Humane Society has two special needs kittens up for adoption.

Natalie and Stephanie came to Flagler Humane Society together. They are only a couple of years old, but Natalie tested postive for the feline leukemia virus. Stephanie is negative for the moment, but, since they came in together she has already been exposed. They have also bonded and are unhappy when separated.

FHS is hoping to find someone who wants to open their heart and home to these kittens. If there are cats in the home they would need to have to be feline lukemia positive. No one wants to infect a healthy cat. If that person is you, please go to FHS and meet these beautiful kitties.